Hiker Hunger is Real–even for the Tiny-Mes

There is one topic that every hiker thinks about, dreams about, and talks about—FOOD! After the first few days, when hikers are too tired to eat, “hiker hunger” reaches epic proportions. It takes 3,000 to 5,000 calories daily to replace what is burned by carrying a heavy pack on mountainous trails.

Story Seeker and Andowen carry 5-7 days of food in their packs. Showers and soft beds are nice benefits of stopping in towns along the trail…but the most important reason for a town day is to resupply meals and snacks. The Tiny-Mes stay out of the way as food is repackaged and stuffed in packs. They don’t want to accidentally find themselves in the trash pile with all the wrappers and heavy packaging! Neither Story Seeker nor Andowen are “morning people.” No time is wasted for cooking with our Jetboil Stove that specializes in bringing water to a boil in a little over one minute. “Hot drinks coming right up!” chirps Tiny A cheerfully. Both Story Seeker and Tiny S need a big cup of hot caffeine to start their day. (Why do you think Tiny S carries a mug with her at all times?!) Andowen and Tiny A prefer to slurp down a breakfast drink and munch on dry cereal while they walk. Snacks and lunch are portable—eaten cold as we hike. When Andowen gets grumpy or Story Seeker walks slower and slower, Tiny A reminds everyone, “EAT! EAT!” It is important to eat calories every hour  to keep up energy and avoid blood sugar crashes. Daily snacks include nuts, dried fruit, cheese crackers, candy, and a protein bar. Once we get to camp for the night, it’s time to cook dinner. Tiny A and Andowen argue over which of the remaining meals is most tasty, but they finally agree on which dinner-in-the-bag to fix. Tiny A lights the stove with her magic staff. (Yep, that’s one use for it!) Hot water is poured into the thick freezer-weight bag. A few minutes later the rice or potatoes with tuna is ready for everyone to eat. “Save some for us!” complains Tiny S. After dinner and evening hot drinks are finished, all “smelly things” have to be bundled in secure bags. (This includes food, trash, and toiletries—anything a bear might find interesting.) The Tiny-Mes help find an appropriate tree—not too close but not too far from camp. Andowen carries the heavy bags and ties them tightly to a branch. Sorry, Bears! No human food for you tonight… Occasionally, when hikers are fixing dinner in camp, they might discuss trail food. But rich, greasy, calorie-laden TOWN FOOD is the stuff of dreams. When hikers meet on the trail, they exchange information about the best places to eat in upcoming towns. Folks might disagree on whether burgers are better, Chinese is top-choice, or pizza is perfect. But everyone agrees a cold drink with large portions of food at cheap prices is the most important consideration.

Now the Tiny-Mes are hungry (again). When do we get to the next town?!

 

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Dirty Laundry

Long-distance hikers have a dirty little secret. Unlike day hikers, we wear the same clothes day after day after day. Laundromats are in short supply out in the woods, which means those hiking clothes get sweaty, smelly, and stiff. “Acceptable” and “normal” are different on the trail!

We carry a set of hiking clothes which we put on every morning–wet or dry, clean or smelly. (Synthetic t-shirt, capris or hiking skirt, bra, shorts-style undies, and hiking socks.) We also carry a set of camp clothes–dry items that keep us from getting chilled when we stop the heavy, sweaty exertion of hiking. Obviously, these camp clothes get less grubby than the hiking clothes! (Synthetic tank top, leggings, thin undies and camp shoes. Plus a long-sleeved synthetic shirt in case it gets cold.) As soon as we get out of our hiking clothes at the end of the day, we hang them up to (hopefully) dry. Sometimes we adorn nails around the shelter. Other times we decorate a nearby tree. At nightfall, we often shove the clothes in our sleeping bags. Even if they are still damp in the morning, at least they won’t be cold and clammy! When we get to town every 4-7 days, we wash all of our clothes. Some hostels have “loaner clothes” to wear while doing laundry. Otherwise, two rain jackets work like a mini-dress while I stuff all the grubby clothes into the washing machine. (Andowen wraps up in her sleeping bag while I do laundry if there are no loaner clothes…) While we are hiking, we rarely notice how smelly we are. After all, everyone stinks! Occasionally, if we get to camp early on a sunny day, we might wash out a few of the most offensive clothes. We use the most basic of laundry facilities…

We dig out the “washing machine” from my pack: a gallon size ziploc bag and tiny bottle of biodegradable soap. Fill the bag partway with water from a stream or spring. Move a few hundred feet away from the water source. Squirt some soap on the clothes and put ’em in the bag. Shake and squeeze the bag, mimicking the agitation of a washer. Dump out filthy water. Add clean water and repeat until water stays clear of dirt or suds. (Yes, it is time consuming. This is why most hikers don’t bother…) We only go to this much effort if our clothes are particularly nasty…and if there is enough sun and a breeze to hopefully get the clothes dry by morning. A short line strung between trees helps. Obviously, we prefer to hike in dry, clean clothes. Sometimes after washing out clothes on the trail, we have to put on still-damp (but clean) hiking clothes in the morning. Ugh! Smaller items can be hung on the outside of our packs to dry by the time we get to camp that night. This dirty little secret of long-distance hikers might sound terrible to you. It’s really not so bad once you get out there. In-town standards of fashion and cleanliness give way to realities of weight and space available in the pack. We might not look or smell like day-hikers…but we hike with a smile on our faces. We love living in the woods…and that’s no secret!

A Day of Backpacking–with our “tiny me”s

Tiny S and Tiny A decided to share the details of a typical day of backpacking with their hikers on the Appalachian Trail. 

7:00 am — Story Seeker wakes up Andowen for the first time. Andowen goes back to sleep while Story Seeker gets the food bags out of the tree and heats water for breakfast. 

7:15 am — Story Seeker wakes up Andowen again. The bribe of ready breakfast gets Andowen out of her cozy sleeping bag! (Hot Carnation Instant Breakfast with powdered milk plus cereal for Andowen; peanut butter crackers and hot tea for Story Seeker)

After breakfast, Andowen and Story Seeker change to their hiking clothes and pack all gear into their backpacks. Water bottles are filled and snacks are chosen for the day. Maps are studied and the first meeting point is chosen. (Andowen is faster so usually hikes ahead, waiting at pre-determined places for Story Seeker to catch up.)

9:00 am — The Tiny Mes climb into the pocket at the top of Story Seeker’s pack. Another day’s hike begins. The Tiny Mes help look for white blazes on tree trunks and rocks–proof everyone is still on the right trail! 

Throughout the day, the hikers eat a snack each hour to keep up their energy: nuts, dried fruit, candy, cheese crackers. Occasionally they stop to enjoy a view, but water and snacks are consumed while walking. 

12:00 noon — the Tiny Mes are restless and demand a break. While they explore, Story Seeker and Andowen eat lunch (a protein bar) and rest for a few minutes. Soon it is time to walk again (before muscles stiffen up!)  When the seating is comfortable enough or the scenery is especially beautiful, they take off their boots, get out journals or the camera, and fully relax for awhile longer. 

After lunch, the day’s hiking continues. Story Seeker and Andowen prefer to hike 8-10 miles a day, less than many hikers but just right for them. 

4:00 pm — typical time to get to camp for the evening. Frequently, everyone sleeps in a 3 walled shelter. Sometimes, to hit their desired daily miles, Story Seeker and Andowen pitch their tent between shelters. Air mattresses and sleeping bags are spread out, headlamps and journals are set beside beds, and dinner is pulled out of food bags. Dry camp clothes are put on and sweaty hiking clothes are hung to air out. 

Once everything is organized, it’s time to get water. “Dirty” water bags are filled at a nearby spring or creek then carried back to camp. (4.5 – 5 ltrs are needed each day for breakfast, hiking, and dinner.) Story Seeker filters water while Andowen cooks supper.

5:00 pm — hot food is ready. Other hikers start coming into the camp area as they finish their own daily mileage. 

The evening is relaxed. Hikers chat, write in journals, read on kindle or phone. Some nights they play cards (if a deck is found in the shelter) or make a campfire. The Tiny Mes look at the map with their hikers to decide how early they need to get up for the next day’s hiking. 

8:00 pm — “Hiker Midnight!” After a long day of hiking, everyone is ready for bed. Goodnight, John-boy! Goodnight, Moon! Goodnight, Tiny Mes! 

(Read an introduction to the Tiny Mes HERE)

The “AT Experience”

I recently read the Summer 2017 issue of AT Journeys magazine from the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC). One article included the official ATC policy on the AT experience. I found these policies interesting to ponder…especially as they relate to the therapeutic value of hiking the Appalachian Trail with my daughter “Andowen.” (Read more about how hiking helps her HERE and HERE.)

“Integral to the trail experience are:

–Opportunities for observation, contemplation, enjoyment, and exploration of the natural world.

Time for contemplation when camped beside a waterfall along the AT in Virginia

–A sense of remoteness and detachment from civilization.

The world disappears when sitting atop a mountain above the clouds!

–Opportunities to experience solitude, freedom, personal accomplishment, self-reliance and self-discovery.

Writing in a journal and making drawings is a great way to record and process our experiences

–A sense of being on the height of the land.

Sometimes it feels like “on a clear day, you can see forever”

–Opportunities to experience the historic and pastoral elements of the surrounding countryside.

If only the ruins we pass could talk…what stories we would hear!

–A feeling of being part of the natural environment.

Hugging Keffer Oak–the second largest tree along the AT. It has an 18′ diameter and is over 300 years old!

–Opportunities for travel on foot, including opportunities for long distance hiking.”

“The mountains are calling and I must go…” –John Muir

I’m sure many of these experiences can be found in other places in nature…but they certainly are part of why we continue to return to the Appalachian Trail for more backpacking adventures!

Adventure…some days it’s HARD!

The number one rule of successful adventure is–Never Quit On a Bad Day! As  John Denver sings “Some days are diamonds, Some days are stone…” It is important to remember that there WILL be sparkly, bright days again, even when this particular one feels dark and heavy. 

Most days we can celebrate the “diamonds” found by spending extended time in the mountains/woods. We enjoy seeing the beautiful views, hearing stories from fellow hikers, and feeling tired pride at the end of the day–the pride of a job well done.

On other days, however, this all feels like a heavy, cumbersome “stone.” We wonder why we are out here. We get teary and angry and just want to quit. (Take a moment of silence in sympathy for my poor hubby when we finally have cell coverage after a few hard days in a row….)

A few days into our trip, daughter Andowen pulled off her backpack and plopped down beside a cross-trail. She was adamant that we were going to hike down to a hostel, call daddy and go HOME right then. I insisted that we would talk about it two days later–after a night in a soft bed and a belly full of town food. We argued about it…but eventually she grabbed her pack and angrily stomped off down the trail. 

Another day I was exhausted. I was physically tired of hiking day after day…and mentally weary of worrying about whether or not there would be water at the next shelter. (The drought in this area causes us to have to carry pounds of extra water each day…ugh!) Being careful to save water so we can make dinner even if the water source near the shelter is dry causes us to skimp on drinking while hiking. Dehydration is a terrible thing! The unrelenting steep climb at the end of that day made things worse. By the time I got to the shelter, all I wanted to do was crawl in my sleeping bag and give up. 

On hard days, adventure comes down to attitude. It is important to acknowledge and feel the full range of emotion. But then, we need to choose. We remind Andowen to reframe the negatives–and look for the positives. This is the first time she has felt homesick—but that also means she finally has friends and roots in our new location. For me, I remind myself to let go of worrying about things I can not control (my daughter’s emotions, the lack of water, how much my muscles ache).

And we remind each other on those hard days—Never Quit on a Bad Day!

WANTED: Volunteers

Wanted: volunteer trail maintainers. Must be hard working with a sense of humor. Responsible for building trail and maintenance and repair of current trails, bridges, shelters, and more. 

Anyone who backpacks on the Appalachian Trail owes huge gratitude to the more than 6000 volunteers who maintain the trail each year. Although the AT is part of the National Park System, it relies on volunteers and on regional maintenance clubs to keep the trail open. 

“Volunteers contribute some 270,000 hours to the A.T. every year, making it one of the largest volunteer-driven projects in the world.” —AT Journeys, Summer 2017 edition

Installation and ongoing repairs include the following types of projects:

Marking the trail with “blazes” on trees or rocks, repairing eroded parts of the trail, and removing trees which fall and block the trail. 

Adding edges to slanted sections of trails near drop offs.

Slowing down erosion on steep sections by building steps from rocks or logs (see photos in previous post HERE) and by building water diversion lines (stones set to guide water off the trail).

Build bridges (fancy like this one…or a simple few logs to cross).

Repair shelters as needed. 

Build privies (outhouses), maintain them (cleaning out trash and wipes throw in them…yuck!), and moving them as needed. 

All of this is hard work. But a sense of humor is also important! Additions like these keep hikers smiling…

An electric box….attached to nothing! 

A plunger for an outhouse!

And a “fireplace” at a shelter with no chimney! 

THANKS to all the men and women who keep the trail clear so daughter and I can enjoy these adventures….

Climbing Mountains

I am frequently reminded on this current backpacking adventure of a saying I heard this summer: 

“Stairs are just organized mountains”

Mountains are beautiful, but can be intimidating to hike up and down. 

(Can you find “Andowen” starting up this mountain?)


Sheer rock faces or slippery steep dirt are intimidating. It sometimes feels like we will fall off the side of the mountain! 

It is always easier if there is at least rock jumble or tree roots to help us keep our footing. 

And, of course, rock steps or log steps are a huge help. (Thanks, volunteer trail maintainers!) 

 

So next time you see a set of stairs,  whether rustic or fancy, remember to say thanks for those “organized mountains” that make life easier! 

 

Trying a Rain Skirt

Andowen prefers to hike in a skirt–with shorts or leggings underneath. Unfortunately, the pretty skirt she used to hike in fell apart–so many mended tears it can’t be fixed any further! We talked about it, and decided to design our own skirt–wanting a a knee-high length and water-repellent material. Hopefully, this skirt will be more sturdy when sitting on rocks and climbing over fallen tree trunks. Ideally, it will also help keep her legs and butt dry when we hike in the rain.

We bought rip stop nylon and copied a wrap skirt she already wears at home.

We chose contrasting colors of thread to make it more fun. I even figured out how to make buttonholes with my sewing machine–followed by snipping the hole open with scissors. (The ribbon waistband pushes through the buttonhole to complete the wrap of the skirt and allow both ends of the ribbon to be tied.) Andowen tried the skirt under the hip-belt of her pack. At first, it kept sliding up–just like the old skirt did. Pulling her t-shirt over the skirt waistband took care of that problem. 

After a few weeks of hiking, we can report she is highly satisfied with this skirt. In drizzling rain and when sitting on wet logs or mossy rocks, it has kept her dry as hoped. It shows some scuffing, but has not ripped like the previous town-wear skirt kept doing. Plus she appreciates the ease of movement this skirt provides. She can even practice “sword”-fighting with full freedom when we are in camp for the night! 

She likes it well enough that I’m planning to make my own wrap skirt when we get home–ready for our next hiking adventure in the summer.

Hiker Hostel

Every week we take an overnight in town to resupply before heading back into the woods. This always includes buying (and repackaging) food for the next section. It usually includes doing a load of laundry to get rid of hiker-stench.

We devour calorie-rich town food–burgers, pizza, ice cream. 

We appreciate faucets and flush toilets. We soak in hot showers. We savor soft beds with pillows. 

Sometimes we stay in cheap hotels. Other times we discover wonderful hiker hostels in trail towns. Last week we enjoyed an extra few days at Angels Rest Hiker’s Haven in Virginia while we waited out the remnants of Hurricane Irma. I highly recommend this hostel to any hiker in the area! 

Of course this place has the usual hostel amenities: loaner clothes so we can do all of our laundry at once; a hiker box to leave our leftovers and to dig for things we might need; and a bunkroom.

(Jeans never worn while hiking–too heavy and cotton wicks body heat when wet)

This place also has a nice bathhouse plus a mobile home with 2 private bedrooms and a shared living room with a comfy couch and real books; a huge fully equipped kitchen; and a large front porch. There are pretty gardens and a yard with a camping area and firepit. Shuttles are available to various points along the trail, and within town. 

Angel’s Rest Hiker Hostel really is a “zerolicious” place to stay when we needed to be in town. (Days off trail are called “zero days” in hiker lingo.) 

But it’s always good to get back to the woods…no matter how nice the accommodations are in town. See you down the trail! 

 

WATER…we need water…

Hikers have to think about water all day long. Out in the woods there is no magic tap to turn for water to come pouring out whenever we want it. We have to find a water source, filter the water, carry water back to camp, and carry water in our packs for while we are hiking. (Read more about this process HERE.)

It felt weird at first, but we have gotten comfortable with using a “bite-valve” to have water at the ready the moment we are thirsty. We have been happy with the water reservoirs we have carried in the past. BUT…sometimes they leak when we don’t get them tightly closed. This means we run short of water when we need it…and it means the stuff in our packs get wet. Blergh! There is a nifty interior pocket for a water reservoir in our packs. BUT…the full bladder must be put in the pack before our other stuff and it is impossible to refill the reservoir without pulling it back out of the pack. That’s hard to do when the pack is filled to the top! And carrying a full day’s supply of water gets heavy. 2-4 pounds may not sound like much but it’s HEAVY to a backpacker! So…this trip we are trying a new method of carrying water. We bought a “Blue Desert Smartube” kit for each of us. This has an adapter to connect with any water bottle.

This solves the above problems with a reservoir: Bottles are easier to tightly close. They fit in exterior pockets, so no leaking inside the pack. In addition, we can carry less water and stop to filter more at water sources we pass during the day. This lessens the weight we have to carry–which always makes us happy! 

Now that we are a few weeks down the trail, we can report that we LOVE our new system! We have made only one change to it which is to carry an extra bottle cap to use (rather than the tubing) when carrying both bottles back to the shelter from a water source.